– a virtual travel experience

Crazy things in nature

from multi-colored trees, reflective salt flats and frozen bubbles to crystal caves and sand waves. Nature offers that…plus more and it is nature at its best.

Rainbow Eucalyptus trees in Kailua, Hawaii.

Rainbow Eucalyptus trees in Kailua, Hawaii

Rainbow Eucalyptus trees in Kailua, Hawaii

The unique multi-hued bark is the most distinctive feature of the tree. Multi-colored streaks on its trunk comes from patches of outer bark that are shed annually at different times, showing the bright-green inner bark. It is the only Eucalyptus species with a natural range that extends into the northern hemisphere and thrives in tropical forests that get a lot of rain.

 Source – wiki

Reflective salt flats in Bolivia.

Salar de Uyuni - salt flat

Salar de Uyuni – salt flats

Salar de Uyuni is the world’s largest salt flat at 4,086 square miles, and was formed as a result of transformations between several prehistoric lakes.

This is not water, the ground is covered in a layer of salt crust so reflective, it perfectly mirrors the sky.

Source – wiki

Frozen air bubbles in Abraham Lake.

Abraham lake

Abraham Lake

Abraham Lake has become world famous, especially among photographers. The artificial lake, on North Saskatchewan River, lies in the foothills of the Canadian Rockies, and is home to a rare phenomenon where bubbles get frozen right underneath its surface

The plants on the lake bed release methane gas and methane gets frozen once coming close enough to much colder lake surface and they keep stacking up below once the weather gets colder and colder during [the] winter season.

Source – wiki

Giant crystal cave in Nacia, Mexico.

Giant crystal cave in Nacia, Mexico

Giant crystal cave in Nacia, Mexico

The cavern, beneath the Naica mine, was discovered, in 1910, by miners.The cave is 950 feet (290 meters) underground. Naica lies on an ancient fault above an underground magma chamber below the cave.

The Naica mining complex, which yields lead, zinc, copper, silver, and gold, zigzags nearly half a mile underground (760 meters). Two other smaller caverns were also discovered in 2000, Queen’s Eye Cave and Candles Cave,[9] and a further chamber was found in a drilling project in 2009. The new cave, named Ice Palace, is 150 m deep and is not flooded, but its crystal formations are much smaller, with small ‘cauliflower’ formations and fine, threadlike crystals

Source – wiki

Beautiful sandstone formations in Arizona.

Sandstone formations in Arizona

Sandstone formations in Arizona

The Wave is a sandstone formation on the slopes of the Coyote Buttes in the Paria Canyon-Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness, located in northern portion of the U.S. state of Arizona. An ideal time to photograph the Wave is the few hours around midday when there are no shadows in the center, although early morning and late afternoon shadows can also make for dramatic photos. After a rain storm, numerous pools form which can contain hundreds of tadpole shrimps. These pools can be present for several days.

Source – wiki

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